By 2050, New Zealand has committed to reduce its CO2 emissions to zero. To achieve this, the country will have to make drastic changes to all parts of society, one of which is the industry.

NZ’s Minister of Energy and Resources meets with Viking

New Zealand’s Minister of Energy and Resources Hon Dr Megan Woods asked to meet with Viking Heat Engines to learn more about the industrial heat pump – the HeatBooster - during her visit to Norway last week. Woods sees heat pumps as one of the key solutions in reaching the country’s ambitious emission target.

By 2050, New Zealand has committed to reduce its CO2 emissions to zero. To achieve this, the country will have to make drastic changes to all parts of society, one of which is the industry.
Ingrid Lofnes, Business Development Manager at Viking Heat Engines, and Tor Hodne, Chief Executive Officer at Viking Heat Engines, meets with Hon Dr Megan Woods, NZs Minister of Energy and Resources

“A big challenge is industrial heat,” says Woods, referring to process heat used in many industrial processes today, such as pasteurization and spray drying.

Process heat accounts for 35% of New Zealand’s energy consumption. And around 55% of process heat demand is supplied by burning fossil fuels, mainly coal and natural gas (source: mbie.govt.nz).

Here’s where heat pump technology can make a significant difference as it drastically reduces the need for fossil fuels by reusing heat that would otherwise be wasted and boosts it up to the required temperatures with a little bit of electricity.

“This type of technology will be absolutely critical,” Woods says, referring to the HeatBooster. “We cannot use the same technology we use today if we’re going to see change.”

At the same time as outlining the country’s challenge in this area, Woods points out that companies in New Zealand, such as the global dairy nutrition company Fonterra*, are already working diligently to keep up with the government’s new and stricter environmental policies.

“Companies are showing great leadership,” she says. “They realize that it’s not only right to do this for the planet, but for the balance sheet too.”

Although the meeting with the minister was in no way an endorsement of the HeatBooster, Tor Hodne, Chief Executive Officer at Viking Heat Engines, hopes it will make the industry in New Zealand more aware of the potential of using heat pump technology in its processes.

“We recently contributed to a report that concludes that heat pumps have the potential to eliminate 5 million tonnes of emissions from industrial processes in Australia,” he says. “In other words, heat pumps can be a real climate solver and help countries such as New Zealand meet their ambitious climate targets. We look forward to working closer with the minister and her department to spread awareness of this technology and hopefully see some real results of our work in the not so distant future.”

For more information about the HeatBooster and how it may benefit your business, please contact sales@vikingheatengines.com.

*The dairy manufacturing sector in New Zealand accounted for around 68% of energy use in food manufacturing in 2016. It was the largest user of coal for process heat, which is a high emitting fuel source (source: mbie.govt.nz).

More stories

Contact Us